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CivicLex Candidate Survey

At-Large Candidates



Agriculture & Food Systems

Chuck Ellinger:

Most Significant Issue: The issue of food desserts is probably the most significant.

Plan to Address it: We added a position at LFUCG for a Local Food Coordinator. Moreover, in 2014 we established the Bluegrass Farm to Table initiative “to promote the development of a more vibrant local food economy by supporting food related agricultural development.” (See LFUCG website) We need to make sure everyone has access to healthy food options. This is a public health issue as well as an economic inequality one. Community gardens, more farmers markets and mobile ones can help alleviate this problem.


Adrian Wallace:

Most Significant Issue: Our most significant Agricultural and Food system issue is food deserts.

We need access to healthy food for all people. I love what I see with programs like Fresh Stop Market that uses a co-op model for the community to acquire fresh produce from local farmers. I would push for the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government to expand our Community Supported Agriculture initiatives to include support for our non-profit partners spearheading equitable food access.

Plan to Address it: Lexington as a community needs to invest in programs such as Fresh Stop and Community Gardens. We can offer grants to organizations and alter zoning so that people can grow produce in their front yards. We need to offer grants to local businesses who want to focus on offering healthy food options. We also need to make sure that food stamps continue to apply towards fresh food purchases in market settings.

Lexington has the resources to ensure that people are fed. We have a strong agricultural history and culture. We just need the infrastructure to get food to the people who need it most.

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Lillie Miller-Johnson:

Most Significant Issue: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Plan to Address it: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Steve Kay:

Most Significant Issue: Developing a local food economy that supports our farmers and provides reliable access to healthy, safe, locally grown food, including collaboration with our surrounding counties.

Plan to Address it: I was instrumental in securing the initial grant funding that led to creation of the position of Local Food Coordinator in the LFUCG Office of Economic Development and to development of the Bluegrass Farm to Table program. I serve on the Advisory Board and will continue to advocate for related programs.


Connie Kell:

Most Significant Issue: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Plan to Address it: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.


Richard Moloney:

Most Significant Issue: I believe there is tremendous potential for hemp production in Fayette County, which will positively impact our agricultural economy in the years ahead. 

Plan to Address it: I will work with the new administration, my council colleagues and UK to establish a hemp processing facility in Fayette County. I envision a facility similar to the new Bluegrass Stockyards.




Arts & Culture

Chuck Ellinger

Most Significant Issue: Lack of funding for the arts is the most significant issue.

Plan to Address it: The LFUCG gives money to Lexarts, which in turn, distributes it to the various arts organizations. Unfortunately, we weren’t able to fund their full request. The most recent increase of 1% of bonded projects for public art will be a nice start to help improve the arts. Moreover, a new arts master plan and commission will help set priorities to move arts forward. Arts are an economic development issue that improves the quality of life in a community.


Adrian Wallace:

Most Significant Issue: The Lexington Arts and cultural scene could be more culturally inclusive.

Lexington has a vibrant arts scene. We see it weekly with gallery hops, our ballet and symphony, and the University of Kentucky having one of the premiere opera programs in the country. However, I would like to see more diversity in these offerings: more gallery showings of artists of color, more public arts projects that are multicultural, more opportunities for all of our youth to engage in the arts.

Plan to Address it: I have already worked with Unlearn Fear and Hate and want to continue to think about how similar efforts can bring our city together. I would also like to see grant opportunities and events by our government intentionally highlight the different cultures and artists that are here in our city but are not as visible.

Our arts need to look and feel like Lexington. We have the artists and musicians to make that happen.


Lillie Miller-Johnson:

Most Significant Issue: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Plan to Address it: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Steve Kay:

Most Significant Issue: We have an increasingly robust arts and culture scene in Lexington, but all such efforts can always use more financial support.

Plan to Address it: I supported Council's recent vote to allocate 1% of capital expenditures for the creation of public art. I serve on the Corridors Commission and have supported the Commission's efforts to include public art as one aspect of corridors enhancement. I will continue to support the city's major contribution to LexArts.


Connie Kell:

Most Significant Issue: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Plan to Address it: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.


Richard Moloney:

Most Significant Issue: I voted to dedicate 1% of our annual bonding budget to the arts, which will result in approximately $300,000 of funding specifically for arts in our community. I think dedicated funding at this level will be a game changer for arts and culture in Lexington. 

Plan to Address it: The next step is to create an arts masterplan and bring a good team together to determine the best use of the funding to have the greatest impact on Lexington.  


Community Design

Chuck Ellinger:

Most Significant Issue: The most significant Community Design issue would be Town Branch Commons.

Plan to Address it: This $30+ million public project will transform the whole downtown from the Distillery District in the west to the Isaac Murphy Memorial Art Garden to the east. Along with the Town Branch Park, which is a $30+ milllion privately funded park, Town Branch Commons must be planned in such a way to have as minimal of impact on day to day traffic and businesses. Moreover, we must keep it in budget and on time.


Adrian Wallace:

Most Significant Issue: We have to become more dense in a sustainable and equitable way, and build infrastructures that are more efficient.

We need spaces that are walkable. We need this growth to be affordable. That means that we partner with developers and nonprofits to ensure that new growth and buildings include affordable housing and mixed income developments. We need some housing that is less expensive than the national criteria for “affordable housing.”

Plan to Address it: The city can support this work through smart planning, strategic grants, building strong ethical relationships with developers, and listening to the people who already live in our communities that could be subject to development.

Growth is going to happen here. Our city’s challenge is to shepherd that growth in a way that works for the people who are already here.


Lillie Miller-Johnson:

Most Significant Issue: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Plan to Address it: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Steve Kay:

Most Significant Issue: We are well behind many similar communities in our awareness of the importance of public spaces as a key component of our quality of life. We need increased efforts to improve our public spaces: parks, roadways, bike and ped paths.

Plan to Address it: I will continue to be an advocate for more programming in our parks, especially the smaller neighborhood parks which have so much unrealized potential, and for increased funding for bike and ped paths.


Connie Kell:

Most Significant Issue: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Plan to Address it: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.


Richard Moloney:

Most Significant Issue: I think it is clear that we need a new City Hall and that we learned an important lesson in process over the last few months.  

Plan to Address it: Within the first 6 months of the new administration, I would like us to begin working to develop recommendations for a new building that will be on government-owned property. I want the process to include significant council and public input. 


Development & Housing

Chuck Ellinger:

Most Significant Issue: The renovation of the Lexington Convention Center and affordable housing.

Plan to Address it: Both of these issues are important and fall in development and housing. The Council allocated up to $20 million in bonds to help with the renovation and construction of an expanded convention center. When it’s complete, the LCC will be able to compete for 90% of all conventions. As far as affordable housing, we need 6000 units in next 12 years. The Council has put in over $11 million since the trust fund was created and has been able to leverage over $86 million. We must continue to fund it.


Adrian Wallace:

Most Significant Issue: Lexington needs affordable housing. My top priority is to fund the Affordable Housing Trust Fund to at least $6 million per the director’s request. If we can find $22 million for Rupp Arena, we can find $6 million to end chronic homelessness. Also, as mentioned above, I want to partner with developers and nonprofit organizations to create more mixed income developments. We need to think creatively. LFUCG is considering relocating. Could some of those spaces be converted into housing that includes affordable housing?

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Plan to Address it: We need to work together to address housing in a way that does not displace people who are already housed and that makes our communities more vibrant for everyone. At the very least, we can give our trust fund the minimum it needs to do its work. As a city councilperson, I will fight for that.


Lillie Miller-Johnson:

Most Significant Issue: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Plan to Address it: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Steve Kay:

Most Significant Issue: Our greatest challenge is protecting and preserving our rural heritage while also ensuring affordable housing for all segments of our community, but especially for those whose wages are insufficient to pay for safe and adequate housing,

Plan to Address it: I was an advocate for creation of the Affordable Housing Fund and designation of secure annual funding of $2 million for its work. As a member of its board I have responsibility to assess proposals and ensure the best use of those funds. Recently I created, and serve on, the Task Force on Neighborhoods in Transition, which is addressing ways to mitigate potential negative impacts of development on vulnerable neighborhoods.


Connie Kell:

Most Significant Issue: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Plan to Address it: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.


Richard Moloney:

Most Significant Issue: Since we voted to not expand the urban services boundary, I think infill and redevelopment will be a significant issue over the next several years.

Plan to Address it: We have zoning ordinances, overlay zones and land use restrictions that will help protect existing neighborhoods, but NIMBY (Not in My Back Yard) is a real problem. Developers will have to creatively blend new projects into the character of established neighborhoods. 


Economic Development

Chuck Ellinger:

Most Significant Issue: Working with Commerce Lexington to help create and retain jobs.

Plan to Address it: Eighty five percent of city’s revenues come from licenses and fees. Since the payroll tax is the prime revenue source, we must stay fully employed. Jobs has to be a top priority. We need to work with Commerce Lexington to create the framework to retain and bring new businesses to Lexington. We must provide the quality of life that employers want to live, work and play. This must include a safe community with an excellent education system.


Adrian Wallace:

Most Significant Issue: Lexington needs local businesses that can thrive. For example, we have one of only 50 Black-owned bookstores in the country. Keeping it open has been a struggle. The owners recently sold it to a group of people who plan to keep it going using a worker co-op model. How do we create a Lexington that is more hospitable to locally owned businesses so that businesses like this can survive?

Plan to Address it: I propose that we develop entrepreneur-centered policies that include opportunities for capital investment to help local and small businesses grow. Or, for those opportunities, we should offer strategic scholarships to aid with fees for inspections or licenses. We could also partner with local nonprofits to help new entrepreneurs learn more about how to run a thriving business.


Lillie Miller-Johnson:

Most Significant Issue: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Plan to Address it: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Steve Kay:

Most Significant Issue: We have an unemployment level that is close to what most economists consider full employment. Some sectors, such as restaurant work and building trades, have trouble finding sufficient workers. Despite all that we have segments of our community with unacceptably high unemployment levels.

Plan to Address it: I will work on developing support for existing programs and development of new programs that work to address chronic unemployment and the mismatch we have between jobs available and people with the skills to fill them.


Connie Kell:

Most Significant Issue: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Plan to Address it: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.


Richard Moloney:

Most Significant Issue: I always say jobs=economic development, and while there is record-low overall, there are areas of Fayette County that are at 20-30% unemployment. At the same time, we need to address a shortage of skilled trade workers in our building, construction and manufacturing sectors.

Plan to Address it: I support training and educational programs specifically geared to bring the folks who are unemployed to the employers who need them. We have plenty of high paying jobs in the skilled trades and plenty of people we can train to fill these jobs.  


Education

Steve Kay:

Most Significant Issue: The achievement gap in our schools continues to create long-term difficulties for our entire community. One contributing factor is transiency, which is the relocation of low-income families with school children multiple times during the school year. This has a negative impact on the children and on the schools that serve them.

Plan to Address it: I will work to focus more of our affordable housing support resources on assuring housing stability for households with school children who are at risk of losing their housing.


Adrian Wallace:

Most Significant Issue: 1. The city and local schools need a stronger relationship. We serve the same families, but do not work together as well as we could to address family needs. We need to fix this.

2. Together with the schools, we need to engage in more prevention and intervention work with our children and youth. We need to be more proactive in reaching and caring for our young people, especially those who are lower income. We need to prevent trauma and also build systems that help our youth to be resilient in the face of it.

Plan to Address it: I would like to open up communication with the schools, where the schools and the city talk to each other, identify root causes together, and find solutions. More specifically, I propose a universal Pre-K program, and I would like to see more fully developed after-school programs that include academic enhancement and social and emotional supports.

Connie Kell:

Most Significant Issue: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Plan to Address it: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Chuck Ellinger:

Most Significant Issue: The issue of school safety.

Plan to Address it: The LFUCG must work cooperatively with the School Board and Public School Administrators to help provide a quality education in a safe environment. The School Boards $13 million new safety plan must be a collaborative effort.


Connie Kell:

Most Significant Issue: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Plan to Address it: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.


Richard Moloney:

Most Significant Issue: It bothers me that our schools do not perform better because I think we could be #1 in the state. I would like the council to continue working with FCPS to help improve the education of our children; our future. 

Plan to Address it: I think there are untapped partnership opportunities where the city can help with afterschool, recreational, arts and other programs. Also, school programs that provide job training can prepare graduates that choose (or must) go to work instead of college. 


Environment & Energy

Chuck Ellinger:

Most Significant Issue: The consent degree with EPA.

Plan to Address it: This $600 million 11-13 year project is the biggest undertaking this government has ever done. We must continue to fix the problems of the stormwater and sanitary sewers and do it in a timely manner.


Adrian Wallace:

Most Significant Issue: We need our energy use in Kentucky to be more affordable and sustainable. We need Lexington to lead the way on this.

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Plan to Address it: Currently, our buildings are not green. Any retrofitting or new building needs to include energy efficient measures. For our neighbors, we need to create a fund to assist with retrofitting their homes to be more energy efficient which helps with affordable housing and sustainability.We also need better public transit, more walkable sidewalks, and more bike lanes which will reduce car use.

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Lillie Miller-Johnson:

Most Significant Issue: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Plan to Address it: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Steve Kay:

Most Significant Issue: Both because it makes sense economically, and because it is the right thing to do, we need to do more to reduce our energy use.

Plan to Address it: I have worked with a broad array of stakeholders on creation of the Empower Lexington Plan, which looks at ways to reduce energy uses in all sectors of the community. I will continue to work with them to update the plan.


Connie Kell:

Most Significant Issue: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Plan to Address it: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.


Richard Moloney:

Most Significant Issue: I have always supported energy saving at LFUCG and I was instrumental in converting to CNG vehicles, hybrid vehicles and other programs. 

Plan to Address it: We must continue to be innovative and set an example to local businesses. I also see a great potential in solar energy, especially securing CDBG funds to install solar panels on low-income housing. 


General Governance

Chuck Ellinger

Most Significant Issue: A city manager that runs the day to day operations is done in some cities.

Plan to Address it: The Mayor is a politically elected position. A city manager would be a professional administrator that would run the day to day operations. We did add a CAO who is similar to a city manager. However, a city manager would not be subject to change with a new administration. It would give continuity and less political influence.


Adrian Wallace:

Most Significant Issue: Our city council needs to consistently reflect the will of the people. Currently, the city council appears to sometimes follow the mayor rather than listening to constituents. We need an independently and critically thinking council with the ability to engage with issues as elected officials, not as mayoral appointees. We also have an out-going mayor who endorsed a current city councilman for Vice Mayor. That has never happened in Lexington before, and is not how this system is supposed to work.

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Plan to Address it: I propose, first, that we elect people who will think and act independently. There are good candidates for that this year, both for specific districts and for this role. Also, I have committed to creating a diverse citizen’s council who will hold me accountable to their communities and on how I am meeting their community needs. The pressures to play political insider games are strong in all politics, and I want to be proactive in making sure that I am always accountable to the voters first.

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Lillie Miller-Johnson:

Most Significant Issue: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Plan to Address it: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Steve Kay:

Most Significant Issue: We need to continue to work on increased transparency to help ensure maximum information for our citizens and broad-based citizen engagement on opportunities and challenges facing our community.

Plan to Address it: I will continue to work on people-oriented processes that attract citizens to become more involved, and on the technical improvements that will lead to all public records possible being easily accessible on-line.


Connie Kell:

Most Significant Issue: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Plan to Address it: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.


Richard Moloney:

Most Significant Issue: I think we have improved our accessibility and transparency, but we need to continue to make it easier for citizens to interact with the City. 

Plan to Address it: We have a user-friendly website, great apps, open data and improved permitting processes, but we need to stay current and innovative.  Our Public Information Office works with each division of government to keep things up to date. 


Immigration


Chuck Ellinger:

Most Significant Issue: This a federal issue that needs to be addressed by Congress.

Plan to Address it: Work with our Federal Representatives to tackle this issue in a fair and humane way. Moreover, work with our multicultural affairs coordinator to address any assistance, communication, training and outreach that is needed.


Adrian Wallace:

Most Significant Issue: Our biggest immigration issue is families being torn apart.

We have children in our schools who have been separated from their parents. We have parents who are terrified to go places and do things. We have a community that does not trust law enforcement to keep them safe, but rather to separate and to shatter.

Plan to Address it: As a people of Lexington, we need to stand with and for our families. First, we should not accept ICE detainees. Our police should not actively work with ICE unless protecting us from a proven violent offender. Also, the city can be a hospitable space for groups who are working to meet the needs of families impacted by ICE. There is a local group arising for this very purpose. We cannot actively join them, but we can help in intangible ways to make sure that all Lexington families are supported.


Lillie Miller-Johnson:

Most Significant Issue: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Plan to Address it: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Steve Kay:

Most Significant Issue: Given the realities of our local economy, we need to do all we can to ensure that people in our community understand the contributions that immigrants make, and to ensure that immigrants are made welcome and treated fairly.

Plan to Address it: I will continue to support funding for the programs and activities of Global Lex, the cities office of multicultural affairs, and continue to be a visible participant as a community leader at multi-cultural events.


Richard Moloney:

Most Significant Issue: Local farmers have been hard hit by the Federal immigration laws and policies. It impacts the horse industry and service sectors too.    

Plan to Address it: Most immigration laws and policies are Federal, and there is not a lot we can do locally. I do support Global Lex, our multilingual, multidisciplinary center that provides a wide range of services to our growing foreign-born population. 


Connie Kell:

Most Significant Issue: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Plan to Address it: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.


Public Health

Chuck Ellinger:

Most Significant Issue: The opioid epidemic.

Plan to Address it: Everyone in our community has been touched directly or indirectly by this epidemic. It has a direct impact on crime. But we can not incarcerate this problem away. We need a multi-disciplinary, holistic approach to tackle this crisis. First we need to limit the supply. Moreover, we need treatment, education, mentoring and a job to give individuals hope and a future.


Adrian Wallace:

Most Significant Issue: The obvious answer is the opioid addiction, but I want to meet it at a symptomatic level. I see our greatest issue as the need for more public prevention and intervention work with children and youth. Research shows that Adverse Childhood Experiences greatly increase one’s chances of addiction as well as cancer, depression, suicidal ideation, and so much more. I want our city to ask how we can prevent trauma (Adverse Childhood Experiences) and how we can aid healing from it.

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Plan to Address it: To prevent trauma we have to address poverty. We have to address housing affordability and stability, wages, income inequality, and mental healthcare.

I want to see summer and after school programming for kids.

We need access to diverse approaches to addiction care. We need more long-term residential care. We need places that will work within a risk-reduction framework. We need people to be able to recover by making sure that they can still have places to live and jobs at which to work.

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Lillie Miller-Johnson:

Most Significant Issue: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Plan to Address it: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Steve Kay:

Most Significant Issue: The opioid epidemic.

Plan to Address it: There is no quick and easy solution to this problem. I will support increased funding for prevention, intervention, and rehabilitation programs.


Richard Moloney:

Most Significant Issue: The opioid epidemic, which has led to a Hepatitis C crisis, has greatly impacted our community.  

Plan to Address it: I took the steps to initiate Lexington’s lawsuit against drug manufacturers and distributors, who are mostly to blame for the opioid crisis. I support a variety of programs that are aimed at prevention and that treat addicted individuals. A recent grant of $2Million will make it possible to do so much more to address this problem. 


Connie Kell:

Most Significant Issue: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Plan to Address it: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.


Public Safety

Chuck Ellinger:

Most Significant Issue: The increase in violent crime and opioids.

Plan to Address it: Last year Lexington set a record for homicides at 28. We are on pass to surpass it. There is a direct correlation with the homicides and drugs. Public safety must be our top priority. We must provide our police with all the necessary equipment to combat these problems. Moreover, we must continue to put an emphasis on community policing. Furthermore, we need to eventually create a 4th sector so police do not have such a large geographical area on the east end to cover.


Adrian Wallace:

Most Significant Issue: Lexington saw 28 murders last year. We’re on track to outpace that number this year.

Again, I want to look at the root causes. It is easy to point at the opioid crisis, but why? Why are we having the crisis? How do we prevent it? How do we deal with it in a way that is more than just a reaction to it?

We have not placed enough emphasis on public health.

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Plan to Address it: We can and MUST focus on prevention and intervention. We need more programs that provide community support for our children and youth. We need the city needs to work closely with the schools to identify challenges earlier. We need better support and reintegration systems for people who have lost their way. We need to address poverty as a root cause. We need to focus on our schools and communities before a crime is even committed in order to address our public safety issues.

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Lillie Miller-Johnson:

Most Significant Issue: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Plan to Address it: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Steve Kay:

Most Significant Issue: The opioid epidemic. Those directly affected pose a threat to the community, and dealing with the effects of the epidemic drains resources from all other aspects of ensuring public safety.

Plan to Address it: There is no quick and easy solution to this problem. I will support increased funding for prevention, intervention, and rehabilitation programs.


Richard Moloney:

Most Significant Issue: I think the opioid epidemic is also our most significant public safety issue as well. Much of our local crime can be tied to drug use and drug dealing. Our police and fire responders are fighting this epidemic on the front line. 

Plan to Address it: I think some of the new $2Million grant will be used to purchase naloxone kits and provide training in the community. I think the money will also help service providers who treat and rehabilitate addicts, and a portion will be used for prevention and education. 


Connie Kell:

Most Significant Issue: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Plan to Address it: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.


Transportation

Chuck Ellinger:

Most Significant Issue: Getting people to use more mass transportation.

Plan to Address it: In order for people to give up their cars, you must make public transportation more convenient and frequent. Public transportation is an economic development issue because it provides an opportunity for many to get back and forth to work. The more people we can get out of their cars and using other means of transportation, the better it will be for traffic and the environment. As an avid cyclist, I am pleased to see the new SPIN bikes because they add a new opportunity for transportation.


Adrian Wallace:

Most Significant Issue: As we maintain our Urban Service Boundary and become more densely populated, transportation becomes a bigger issue.

Also, Lexington currently operates as a wagon wheel with our loops and circles and spokes of the wheel. Our buses travel on routes that resemble those loops and spokes, but that is not necessarily how people move through the city. We need to assess where and how people move and build alternative routes that reflect that.

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Plan to Address it: We must expand our roads, make our sidewalks more walkable, expand our bike lanes, and improve our city transit with a 50-year transit plan that includes light rail. We need public transit that is more efficient and sustainable.

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Lillie Miller-Johnson:

Most Significant Issue: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Plan to Address it: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Steve Kay:

Most Significant Issue: This is a time of transition. The introduction of Uber and Lyft have changed the way people think about and use public transportation. Self-driven vehicles are already being piloted in a few communities around the country. We have dockless bikes here now and are considering dockless scooters in the near future. Our challenge is to determine how to integrate these new systems into the fabric of our community in a way that enhances rather than undermines our quality of life.

Plan to Address it: I will work with my colleagues on Council to monitor and evaluate the systems we presently have and to inform ourselves about the best options for ensuring that new systems serve the community.


Connie Kell:

Most Significant Issue: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.

Plan to Address it: Has not responded as of 9/24/2018.


Richard Moloney:

Most Significant Issue: I think maintaining and improving our infrastructure is an essential government function. 

Plan to Address it: I serve on the MPO, which is a regional planning body, and we are always looking for ways to improve our roads, traffic signaling and public transportation. Alternative transportation options and improved walkability are also addressed.



Richard Young