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County Offices

 

County Offices (Partisan)

 

Commonwealth’s Attorney

What is this race?

Commonwealth's attorney is the title given to the elected prosecutor of felony crimes in Kentucky and Virginia. Other states refer to similar prosecutors as district attorney or state's attorney.

A commonwealth's attorney is the highest law enforcement official in his or her jurisdiction. The prosecutors decide what criminal charges to bring, and when and where a person will answer to those charges. In carrying out their duties, prosecutors have the authority to investigate persons, grant immunity to witnesses and accused criminals, and plea bargain with defendants.

A commonwealth's attorney is a constitutional officer, which means that the job is established in the state's constitution which defines the position, the broad powers of the elected officeholder and in Virginia, the requirement that every county and every city be served by a commonwealth's attorney. 

Commonwealth's attorneys are elected in their respective jurisdictions in both Virginia and Kentucky for terms of four years and six years, respectively.


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Circuit Clerk

What is this race?

A circuit clerk is is an officer of the court whose responsibilities include maintaining records of a court. Another duty is to administer oaths to witnesses, jurors, and grand jurors.


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Vincent Riggs (Dem)

No Opponent

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Property Valuation Administrator

What is this race?

The Commonwealth of Kentucky adopted the title Property Valuation Administrator (PVA) in place of the more commonly used county tax commissioner or tax assessor. Each of the 120 counties has a PVA Office with a locally elected PVA. 

The PVA Office is required to administrate "ad valorem" taxes. Ad valorem is Latin for "according to value," which means that taxes are based on the value of the property. The Kentucky Constitution describes property tax as a tax on wealth rather than a tax on the individual.

Tracking ownership changes, maintaining tax maps, updating building characteristics and administering exemptions for real property are also continuous duties of the PVA Office.


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David O’Neill (Dem)

No Opponent

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County Judge/Executive

What is this race?

A County Judge/Executive is an elected official in the U.S. Commonwealth of Kentucky who is the head of the executive branch of a government in a county. The Judge/Executive is an ex officio member of the Fiscal Court, the county's legislature. The position is established by the Kentucky Constitution, Section 144, and may not be abolished without amending that document.

The Judge/Executive serves a four-year term and may be re-elected indefinitely. Though he wields no judicial power, the Judge/Executive is often informally referred to as "The Judge", is formally addressed as "Your Honor", and is styled as "The Honorable". The Judge/Executive is a voting member of the Fiscal Court, enabling him to exercise a role in the legislative process.

In Kentucky's consolidated city-county governments, premier executive power is exercised by either the Metro Mayor (i.e. Louisville) or the Urban-County Mayor (i.e. Lexington). The counties in which these cities reside retain, and fill by election, their offices of County Judge/Executive.


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Jon Larson (Rep)

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County Attorney

What is this race?

Every county in Kentucky has an elected County Attorney (there are 120) who serves a four year term. Every County Attorney is employed on a part-time basis. This works very well for most offices because the case load in many counties is small enough to not require a full-time prosecutor, and this allows any County Attorney who wishes to do so to maintain a private practice.


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Larry S. Roberts (Dem)

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No Opponent

 

County Clerk

What is this race?

The County Clerk is a constitutional officer elected to a four year term. Originally created to serve as a county's official record-keeper, the responsibilities of a County Clerk have evolved to include many other services.

The County Clerk's duties include: the recording and administration of official documents of many kinds, the preparation and printing of property tax bills, the registration of voters and conduct of elections, and the registration and titling of motor vehicles.


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Don Blevins, Jr (Dem)

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No Opponent


Sheriff

What is this race?

Sheriffs in Kentucky are elected for four-year terms and are not term limited. Sheriffs and deputies in Kentucky have the authority to patrol as well as power of arrest in all areas of their particular county, including incorporated cities. Most sheriffs, however, choose to patrol incorporated cities either only on the request of city officials or in the case of a major emergency. Sheriff's deputies will jointly patrol unincorporated areas of their county with the Kentucky State Police. In addition, sheriffs in Kentucky are responsible for court security, serving court papers and transporting prisoners. They are also responsible for collecting taxes on real estate and tangible property. Also, Kentucky law states that only the county coroner, also an elected peace officer, can serve the sitting sheriff with a state criminal court process or place him/her under arrest (any peace officer, however, can arrest the coroner).

One of the main differences between Kentucky sheriffs and sheriffs in other states is that Kentucky sheriffs do not run the county jails.


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Kathy H. Witt (Dem)

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County Commissioner- District 1

What is this race?

County commissioners are elected only in counties where a majority of the voters have adopted a commissioner form of fiscal court at an election held pursuant to KRS 67.050. County commissioners hold no other powers or duties beyond those held as members of the fiscal court, except that they may perform marriages if authorized by the governor or the county judge/executive.

The commissioners from each district run every 4 years in staggered years.


Robert “Bob” Pattie (Rep)

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No Opponent

 

County Commissioner- District 2


Doug Rigsby (Dem)

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No Opponent

 

County Commissioner- District 3


Kevin Akers (Rep)

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Chrysanthia Carr-Seals (Dem)

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Coroner

What is this race?

The Fayette County Coroner's Office serves the community by providing timely death investigations in a professional and courteous manner, while ensuring the highest level of compassion, dignity and respect for the deceased and their families.

The Fayette County Coroner investigates all deaths reported to the office that fall under our jurisdiction. The office also manages the indigent burial and cremation program through LFUCG.

All investigative staff of the Fayette County Coroner's Office are required to become certified through the American Board of Medicolegal Death Investigators within two years of appointment.



County Surveyor

What is this race?

A county surveyor is a public official in many counties of the United States. Most of these officials are elected on the partisan ballot to four-year terms. They administer the county land survey records, re-establish and maintain the official government survey monuments, and review property boundaries surveys and subdivision plans. Other duties vary from state to state.


Gary Roland

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No Opponent


Magistrate- District 1

What is this race?

In counties with a magisterial form of fiscal court, the most important function of the justice of the peace or magistrate is service on the fiscal court. The terms justice of the peace and magistrate are synonymous (OAG 85-30). However, the office of justice of the peace or magistrate, unlike that of county commissioner, is a constitutionally required office that must be filled regardless of the form of the fiscal court. Although the constitution mandates their election, justices in counties with a commissioner form of fiscal court have few duties. Before 1978, magistrates possessed important judicial duties, but the Judicial Amendment to the constitution abolished the magisterial courts and stripped magistrates of their judicial duties. In counties with a county commissioner form of fiscal court, magistrates’ few remaining duties include the solemnization of marriages and the acceptance of applications for notaries public. Justices of the peace or magistrates may perform marriages if so authorized by the governor or the county judge/executive (KRS 402.050).

The constitution requires that each county be divided into three to eight districts in a manner determined by the General Assembly. One justice of the peace or magistrate must be elected from each district (Ky. Const., sec. 142). Justices of the peace or magistrates serve 4-year terms (Ky. Const., sec. 99).


J. Michael Haskins (Dem)

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Magistrate- District 2


Lisa Moore Fath (Rep)

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No Opponent


Magistrate- District 3


Mary Moore Whittingham (Rep)

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Robert A. Winburn (Dem)

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Constable- District 1

What is this race?

In Kentucky, constables are elected from each magistrate district in the state. There are between three and eight magistrate districts in each county. Under Section 101 of the Kentucky Constitution, constables have the same countywide jurisdiction as the county sheriff.

Prior to the 1970s, the main function of the constables was to provide court service and security to the Justice of the Peace courts. However, since these have been eliminated by judicial reform, the office of constable now has few real functions. Constables still have the power of arrest and to execute warrants, subpoenas, summonses and other court documents, and are required to execute any court process given to them. On the approval of the Fiscal Court (the legislature of the county) they may equip their vehicles with oscillating blue lights and sirens.

Most constables in Kentucky are not paid a salary, but are paid fees for services rendered. However, state law provides for payment of an annual salary of $9,600 to constables in counties with a population of over 250,000; as of the 2000 U.S. Census, this only applies in Louisville Metro/Jefferson County and the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government. The payment has become a point of controversy, since constables in Kentucky have few actual duties. The state has authorized a salary of up to $9,600 a year, but the Louisville Metro Council cut it to $100 a month, plus expenses.

Anyone standing for election as a Constable must be at least 24 years of age, a resident of Kentucky for at least 2 years, and a resident of the county and district for at least a year prior to election. Since Constables are Constitutional peace officers they are exempt from attending the mandatory Department of Criminal Justice Training academy, although they may choose to do so. Sheriffs, Coroners, and Jailers (but not their deputies) are also exempted law enforcement officers. The Kentucky Constables Association is affiliated with the National Constables Association.


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Wade A. McNabb (Dem)

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Graham Jackson (Write-In)

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Constable- District 2


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Jim McKenzie (Rep)

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Kenneth Wayne Winburn (Dem)

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Constable- District 3


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Edward “Eddie” Sparks (Dem)

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No Opponent


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